Stacey Allaster, chief executive of the US Tennis Association is ready for challenges



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Stacey Allaster, chief executive of the US Tennis Association is ready for challenges

Stacey Allaster, chief executive of the United States Tennis Association, recently watched a match between Serena Williams and Bianca Andreescu in which she was neutral. However, she was glad for Bianca's victory
"It was so surreal," Allaster said recently.

"When I was at Tennis Canada, we hoped one day we would have a player win a Grand Slam, so then for it to happen at the Grand Slam I was involved with was pretty incredible. It was amazing to be there and to experience that, and see Bianca own that moment and rise to the noise level and energy of 24,000 fans."

, as quoted by ESPN

Allaster as a tournament director of the US Open

"It felt like a 'This is real' moment,'" she said. "Before that, you're kind of in the get-things-done mode, so hearing it aloud made it sink in.

I had the privilege previously of running the organization that Billie Jean King founded, the WTA, and there I was walking onto court, and I put my hand on 'Pressure is a Privilege,' Billie's quote that's right there at that entrance.

"It is a privilege for me to have this opportunity because so many other women, Billie, and the 'Original 9', Chrissie [Evert], Martina [Navratilova] and so many others have paved the way for a woman to have this leadership position.

It is symbolic, but also more importantly, showing all other leaders, especially young leaders, that they too can achieve their leadership goals within our sport. I haven't really been able to fully reflect on it, but it is a very important moment."

The main goal is to provide security measures at the US Open to prevent the appearance of coronavirus "If at any time we don't feel that level of confidence that we have today, then we'll make a very easy call, and we'll work with the local public health authorities along this journey," she said.

"We feel it's worth a try and in the best interest of tennis and the industry overall to do so, but the health, well-being, and safety of every person involved in the US Open will always be at the forefront of our decision."

She is aware of all the misfortunes that may befall her but seems to be ready for the position she is in "With 15 years with Tennis Canada and 10 years at the WTA, which has 55 events in 33 countries, I am an expert in crisis management," she said.

"Because within the live event experience, you don't know what is going to happen, but you know something is going to happen. I have dealt with everything -- being in a country where there was terrorism, significant earthquakes, the hurricanes, a tsunami, the nuclear reactor cracking in Tokyo and radioactivity coming across the Pacific, contamination of food, the Northeastern Seaboard blackout, SARs in 2003. Allaster became the tournament director of the US Open in June, which no woman has succeeded in so far