Ben Rothenberg against Novak Djokovic's fans



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Ben Rothenberg against Novak Djokovic's fans

After winning his ninth Australian Open and his eighteenth Grand Slam title around Novak Djokovic, world number one and currently the best tennis player on the Tour, there is always a climate divided between avid fans of the Serbian champion and almost haters.

'who don't like Nole's behavior and some ways of doing things. Among these there are obviously the fans of Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer, great rivals of the champion and who together with him make up the Big Three, but not only.

In fact, there are also other fans who do not like it and Goran Ivanisevic himself, coach of the Balkan champion, stressed that both among fans and especially the media there is almost a fashion to attack Nole whatever happens.

Djokovic at least on the pitch responds to everyone and this year by destroying Daniil Medvedev in the final he confirmed that he is once again the man to beat. Novak has now beaten almost all records and is officially on the hunt for the only record he is missing, namely the number of Grand Slam titles where with 18 titles he is down to Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, both at 20.

Already this year with Wimbledon and the US Open (including Roland Garros where however Rafa is the favorite) Djokovic will have the opportunity to shorten or join his eternal rivals.

Ben Rothenberg against Novak Djokovic's fans

Ben Rothenberg, a reporter for the New York Times, in the course of a recent interview, which also came after the victory of Novak Djokovic at the Australian Open 2021, tried to explain what this almost hostile climate towards the world number one could derive from.

Here are the his words: "The most avid part of Novak Djokovic fans is extremely aggressive and hateful, in a way I guess, that even Novak Djokovic appreciates and certainly is not. I don't think he appreciates this behavior that we can see especially within social networks.

Fans do not understand that this certainly damages the image of their player who is always kind and behaves well. All athletes have a certain group of fans, but Nole's fans have always made this particular and genuinely not great impression."

After having secured the overtaking against Roger Federer in the special ranking of the weeks at the top of the ranking, the Serbian champion Novak Djokovic has in fact limited himself to doing what he has always been able to do best: to win.

Again at the Australian Open. After a tournament seasoned by controversy (and also by some physical annoyance) the number one of the big group has in fact kept the best for the last two games. He won the match against the surprise Aslan Karatsev and destroyed, tactically and mentally, Daniil Medvedev in the final.

What more than an alternative to the Djokovic Australian Open version seemed almost a certainty. And instead Djokovic is Djokovic. He resists in the first set and spreads completely between the second and third fractions. Evidently also highlighting the limits of a player who perhaps, perhaps, is not yet ready to win a Grand Slam.

It ends 7-5 6-2 6-2 after just under two hours of play: Nole adds the ninth pearl to the series of successes in the Slam downunder (practically putting himself behind only Rafael Nadal at Roland Garros) but above all reaches altitude eighteen in the Grand Slams.