Musculoskeletal injuries in soccer: do basic exercises help?



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Musculoskeletal injuries in soccer: do basic exercises help?

Do exercise-based prevention programs reduce non-contact musculoskeletal injuries in football (soccer)? A systematic review and meta-analysis with 13 355 athletes and more than 1 million exposure hours, is a very interesting study, published on the British journal of sports medicine, which makes a precise retrospective on an aspect that can help prevent one of the most common and annoying injuries in soccer.

In the research we can read: "The aim of this systematic review was to investigate the effect of exercise-based programs in the prevention of non-contact musculoskeletal injuries among football players in comparison to a control group.

Studies were eligible if they included football players aged 13 years or older, used exercise-based programs as intervention, presented the number of non-contact musculoskeletal injuries (ie, defined as any acute sudden onset musculoskeletal injury that occurred without physical contact) and exposure hours for each group, and had a control group (eg, usual training, minimal intervention, education).

Musculoskeletal injuries in soccer: do basic exercises help?

All types of exercise-based prevention programs were eligible for inclusion. Risk of bias for each included study and overall quality of evidence for the meta-analysis were assessed.

Ten original randomized controlled trials with 13 355 football players and 1 062 711 hours of exposure were selected. Pooled injury risk ratio showed very low-quality evidence that exercise-based prevention programs reduced the risk of non-contact musculoskeletal injuries by 23% (0.77 (95% CI 0.61 to 0.97)) compared with a control group.

Exercise-based prevention programs may reduce the risk of non-contact musculoskeletal injuries by 23% among football players. Future high-quality trials are still needed to clarify the role of exercise-based programs in preventing non-contact musculoskeletal injuries among football players."