Aaron Rodgers tells how psychedelic helped him improve his mental health



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Aaron Rodgers tells how psychedelic helped him improve his mental health

Aaron Rodgers said a plant-based psychedelic ayahuasca helped him reach the level of self-love where he is now. Ayahuasca is a psychoactive tea that contains the hallucinogenic drug DMT and is mostly found in Central and South America.

This week, Rodgers appeared on Aubrey Marcus' podcast, during which he reflected on his mental health journey. “To me, one of the core tenets of your mental health is that self-love,” Rodgers said, per Sports Illustrateed.

“That’s what ayahuasca did for me, was help me see how to unconditionally love myself. It’s only in that unconditional self love, that then I’m able to truly be able to unconditionally love others. And what better way to work on my mental health than to have an experience like that?”

Rodgers on wanting to be better toward his teammates

“The greatest gift I can give my teammates, in my opinion, is to be able to show up and to be someone who can model unconditional love to them,” Rodgers said.

“I mean obviously it’s important I play well, and show up and lead and all that stuff. They won’t care about what you say until they know how much you care”. Meanwhile, Rodgers is preparing for the new season.

This offseason, Rodgers signed a three-year extension with the Green Bay Packers. Shortly after Rodgers decided to return to the Packers, Davante Adams decided to leave the Packers and sign with the Las Vegas Raiders. After losing an All-Pro wide receiver in Adams, the Packers also lost Marquez Valdes-Scantling, who signed with the Kansas City.

The Packers used the draft to address their wide receiver issue, drafting Christian Watson, Romeo Doubs and Samori Toure. For many years, Rodgers and Adams were considered as one of the most formidable NFL duos. With Adams gone, some wonder how will the offense look without him.

However, Rodgers believes the Packers will be just fine. "Every year there's opinions that start coming out about players in helmets and shorts, and I would say let's everybody just take a nice deep long breath and trust the training camp time that we have, trust the coaching staff, trust the relationships that will continue to be formed, trust the guys in the room like Allen Lazard, and Randall Cobb, and Sammy Watkins to help these young guys out," Rodgers said.