LeBron James rips media for not receiving questions about Jerry Jones photo



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LeBron James rips media for not receiving questions about Jerry Jones photo

LeBron James accused the media of double standards as he directly asked reporters why he didn't receive any questions regarding the 1957 Jerry Jones photo. After Kyrie Irving was suspended following his promotion of a movie full of antisemitic material, the reporters asked James to share his thoughts on the situation.

Recently, The Washington Post published a photo of Dallas Cowboys owner Jones from 1957, which showed Jones among the white students that weren't letting a group of six Black students to enter North Little Rock High School.

"I got one question for you guys before you guys leave. I was thinking when I was on my way over here, I was wondering why I haven't gotten a question from you guys about the Jerry Jones photo. But when the Kyrie [Irving] thing was going on, you guys were quick to ask us questions about that," James said, per ESPN.

James: You asked me about Irving, but not about Jones

James suggested that the media only ask questions and raise concerns after a Black athlete does something. "When I watch Kyrie talk and he says, 'I know who I am, but I want to keep the same energy when we're talking about my people and the things that we've been through,' and that Jerry Jones photo is one of those moments that our people, Black people, have been through in America.

And I feel like as a Black man, as a Black athlete, as someone with power and a platform, when we do something wrong, or something that people don't agree with, it's on every single tabloid, every single news coverage, it's on the bottom ticker.

It's asked about every single day. But it seems like to me that the whole Jerry Jones situation, photo -- and I know it was years and years ago and we all make mistakes, I get it -- but it seems like it's just been buried under, like, 'Oh, it happened.

OK, we just move on.' And I was just kind of disappointed that I haven't received that question from you guys," James added. Meanwhile, Jones was 14 when the photo was taken. When asked about the 1957 photo, Jones insisted he wasn't trying to block the Black students, but was rather just watching what was happening.

"I didn't know at the time the monumental event really that was going on. I'm sure glad that we're a long way from that. I am. That would remind me [to] just continue to do everything we can to not have those kinds of things happen," Jones explained.