Yankees' Manager Aaron Boone Ejected Early in Game Against Athletics

Tensions flare early at Yankee Stadium during Monday's game

by Nouman Rasool
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Yankees' Manager Aaron Boone Ejected Early in Game Against Athletics
© Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

In a startling turn of events at Yankee Stadium during Monday's matinee game against the Oakland Athletics, New York Yankees' manager Aaron Boone was ejected from the game after just five pitches. The series opener, which concluded in a 2-0 loss for the Yankees, saw Boone dismissed from the dugout following a contentious call by home-plate umpire Hunter Wendelstedt.

The incident unfolded when Athletics' leadoff batter Esteury Ruiz was hit by a pitch on his foot on an 0-2 count. While the pitch visibly struck Ruiz, the Yankees' bench contended he had swung. Boone voiced his disagreement, prompting a sharp response from Wendelstedt, who was heard on the broadcast stating, "You're not yelling at me...

You got anything else to say, you're gone." Boone was ejected shortly after when objections purportedly arose from the Yankees' dugout. Surprisingly, Boone argued that the contentious remarks had come from a fan, not from him or his team.

The ejection sparked Boone to rush onto the field, protesting that he had not spoken and the objection had come from behind the dugout, not from within it. Despite his protests, Wendelstedt stood by his decision, leading to Boone's second ejection of the season and his 35th since 2018—marking the highest number among major league managers.

Post-game, Boone expressed frustration, particularly with first-base umpire John Tumpane's decision on an appeal that Ruiz had not swung at the pitch. Boone noted that his main issue with Wendelstedt was over the non-call on the swing, and when Wendelstedt threatened ejection, Boone backed down, only to be surprised by his dismissal moments later.

Umpire Justifies Ejection

Wendelstedt, who spoke to a pool reporter post-game without having seen a replay of the incident, justified his decision by indicating he believed the derogatory remark came from a player, but opted not to confront the individual to avoid ejecting a player.

"Aaron Boone runs the Yankees. He got ejected," Wendelstedt explained, emphasizing the need to keep players in the game for the fans. This incident wasn't the quickest ejection in MLB history, a record held by Baltimore's Earl Weaver and Los Angeles Angels' John Lackey in notably heated moments.

However, it underscores the ongoing tensions and high stakes in major league baseball, where every call can turn the tide of the game.

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